Low Profit Limited Liability Company

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Low Profit Limited Liability Company

A limited liability company in some U.S. states that has statutory duties other than making a profit for owners. It may be formed for many purposes, such as to provide steady jobs to employees or to protect the environment. It is treated as a limited liability company for legal and tax purposes. It is not prohibited from making a profit, but it is subject to fewer regulatory requirements than a non-profit in the United States.
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from population of 'pure' Alpine chamois, population of 'pure' Balkan chamois, or population where introgression of genes of both subspecies had occurred in the past (thereafter 'hybrid population'), had a significant effect on the L2 horn segment growth, L2C and L3C for males (p < 0.001).
(7.) Kate Cooney et al., Benefit Corporation and L3C Adoption: A Survey, STAN.
New organizational forms such as the Low-Profit Limited Liability Company (L3C) or B Corp Certification are possible venues for human service research funding.
Just as the L3C embeds socially beneficial purposes into its business structure but maintains the basic partnership form, benefit corporations have socially beneficial purposes embedded within the traditional corporation structure.
description of itself notes its ability as an L3C to receive grants like
Notably, the IRS did not include an example in which the recipient organization is a low-profit limited liability company (L3C), a relatively new business entity designed to attract foundation investment.
In fact, the growing airline proudly proclaims that it is the industry's first truly Low Cost Cargo Carrier, hereafter known as the L3C model.
Cunningham, CEO, ReCitizen, L3C, & Author, ReCivilizing
Stuart Arnett fields a lot of questions about the "L3C" at the end of his company's name.
Some are turning to hybrid entities, including the low-profit limited liability company (L3C), which was specifically designed to increase the number of program-related investments that private foundations can make to such socially centered businesses.
29, 37 n-29 (2011) ; see also John Tyler, Negating the Problem of Having "Two Masters": A Framework for L3C Fiduciary Duties and Accountability, 35 VT.