Kyoto Protocol

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Kyoto Protocol

An international treaty intended to combat global warming that limits the amount of greenhouse gases that nations may emit. Every major country in the world has ratified the Kyoto Protocol except the United States (which never ratified it) and Canada (which withdrew in 2011). The treaty was signed in 1997 and came into effect in 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
Government ministers are meeting at a UN conference in Bali, Indonesia, to try to launch talks on a successor to the Kyoto pact to be concluded by 2009, which would allow three years for ratification before the existing pact expires.
The protest marked the start of the Kyoto pact to fight global warming.
Japan in talks with Romania on emissions trading under Kyoto pact
Ever since the US backed out of the Kyoto pact after Pres Bush took office in 2001, Russia has held the treaty's fate in its hands.
When he became president, he promptly rejected the Kyoto pact on climate change, which has been approved by more than 170 nations and mandates reductions of greenhouse gases.
Japan will push for the conclusion of the Kyoto pact on global warming without revisiting the controversies that almost derailed the negotiations in Bonn last July, according to a Japanese position paper for U.N.
Then (if the Kyoto pact is ratified)...they will also have access to high-quality carbon sequestration benefits under Kyoto's flexibility mechanisms.''
Using a mix of financial incentives, regulatory changes, and market measures, the report says, the United States could reduce emissions by 14 percent from 1990 levels, double the goal mandated by the Kyoto pact. And last year the Union of Concerned Scientists concluded that the United States can meet its emissions-reduction goals with no net impact to the economy and actually stands to prosper from "technologies that will become increasingly important in the 21st century."
What has likely condemned the Kyoto pact to the fate of the still-unsigned biodiversity treaty was its failure to get developing countries to agree to binding targets.
If revisions to the Kyoto pact cannot be achieved, delegates may seek to adopt a decision at the talks that would set emissions cut targets for developed countries, a compromise that would not be legally binding and therefore unlikely to satisfy developing countries.
The existing Kyoto pact obliges industrialised nations to cut emissions until 2012, and the idea behind the Copenhagen talks is to get action from all major emitters, including China and India, which were exempt from the Kyoto agreement.
The leaders will be meeting in Singapore a month ahead of global climate talks in Copenhagen to thrash out a successor to the Kyoto pact.

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