Kyoto Protocol

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Kyoto Protocol

An international treaty intended to combat global warming that limits the amount of greenhouse gases that nations may emit. Every major country in the world has ratified the Kyoto Protocol except the United States (which never ratified it) and Canada (which withdrew in 2011). The treaty was signed in 1997 and came into effect in 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sources of fossil fuels have created very different responses to the Kyoto Accord and other efforts to decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the two countries.
Delegates to the UN climate conference on the tropical Indonesian island of Bali reached an agreement on a "road map" for replacing the failed and expiring Kyoto Accord with a new agreement by 2009--but not before the lead UN official at the conference erupted into tears.
The 187 countries, including Britain, hope to have the new pact, which succeeds the Kyoto accord, in place by 2012.
The 10 per cent renewable energy figure, of course, is above the statutory obligations of the electricity generators (which have to achieve a four per cent target) and in theory is meant to go some way towards discharging the UK's obligations under various climate change treaties, principally the Kyoto accord.
And the Kyoto accord's lack of emissions targets for developing countries with rapidly growing greenhouse gas emissions will become increasingly untenable in the years and decades ahead.
The aim is to prevent the Kyoto accord's 144 signatories from setting hard targets for deep emission cuts, or at least to provide a plausible political shelter for governments that oppose mandatory cuts but need to look like they are fighting climate change in the eyes of their own peoples.
Although the Kyoto Accord was not signed by the US, Australia, and others, many nations did sign it and are taking the agreement seriously.
The Liberal government of Jean Chretien ratified the Kyoto accord in 2002, committing Canada to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by six per cent from 1990 levels by 2012.
Under the Kyoto accord, bio-ethanol is considered carbon-neutral and help fight global warming because the plants and grains used to manufacture it absorb the same amount of carbon dioxide as it is emitted when it is burned.
Forget the fact that the junior economist running the country doesn't understand global warming and still can't figure out the economics of the Kyoto Accord. We just need Gary Lunn to support a fair and sensible policy for Northern Ontario.
Strangely enough, the Conservatives couldn't find a trick to stop passage of a motion designed to force the government to take immediate action on the Kyoto Accord on climate change.
And the framework of a move diplomatically to contain the problem exists in the form of the 2005 Kyoto Accord, with 120 signing countries--not including the United States.