Kerrab

(redirected from Kirab)

Kerrab

A Turkish measure of length approximately equivalent to 4.25 centimeters. It became obsolete when Turkey made the metric system mandatory in 1933.
References in periodicals archive ?
The classification system used by his Bedouin informants parallels the Kirab al-Nabat genre.
At specified times, such as the occasion of bersi desa (cleansing of the village), the community's boundaries are maintained by a kirab, a circumambulation of the village (or kampung) during which the Islamic call to prayer may be called out but which may also involve the parading of sacred items like ritual daggers or agricultural produce or other items that reflect the social unit.
He makes the annual offerings (labuhan) that are supposed to protect the palace, the ruler and the people (Schlehe 1996:400) and he and his people circumambulate (kirab) their local community counter-clockwise (59) to assuage the mountain's anger, reciting the Surat Yasin from the Koran as they do so (Surya 18-5-2006).
Another common solution, at the keraton level, similar to the one used in the kampung, is a circumambulation (kirab) during which heirlooms, including a white water-buffalo, are led in procession around the city (Jawa Pos 10-2-2005, 11-1-2008; Surya 11-2-2005).
If the kirab maintains boundaries, labuhan offerings maintain good relations with the spirit world on the state level, at least that of the traditional Central Javanese sultanates.
The sacrificers at Porong wore Islamic symbols while addressing earth spirits, and kirab in kampung are said to at once thank God for a bountiful harvest and satisfy the demands of the community's tutelary spirit.
Tourism attractions are dominated by historical and archeological objects such as ancient buildings and objects) and natural beauty such as waterfalls, sparkling beaches, beautiful valleys and biological garden) and cultural wealth (kirab, syawalan, ngaben etc.).
251/865) concurs in Kirab al-Amtv(71: "Al-Hushaym b.
Abu 1-asim al-Tabari said in Kirab al-Sunna: cUmar wrote to the garrison cities (anksar) that they dock their forelocks and not wear the Muslims' dress, in order that they be known.