Khan

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Related to Khanates: Jagatai Khanate

Khan

In Cambodia, one of eight subdivisions of the capital, Phnom Penh. A khan is roughly equivalent to a district or neighborhood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, Central Asia, the most prominent state where Turks Khanate originated in the sixth century A.D.
Petersburg had established protectorates over the Middle Asian khanates only some 150 years later.
In 1924, following the establishment of Soviet power, the Soviet Socialist Republic of Uzbekistan was founded from the territories including the Khanates of Bukhara and Khiva and portions of the Ferghana Valley that had constituted the Khanate of Kokand.
Following the decline of the Timurid dynasty, other cities in the area rose to prominence as the seats of independent khanates.
With the passing of the Shaibanid dynasty at the end of the sixteenth century, the Uzbek empire split into three squabbling khanates of Khiva, Bukhara--of which Samarkand was part--and Kokand.
Afterward, a variety of relationships developed between Sufis and Inner Asian elites during the period of the Mongol Empire, in the successor khanates, and eventually in other Inner Asian kingdoms.
Interestingly enough, it was an Englishman, Anthony Jenkinson, who established the first semi-official contacts between the tsar and the Central Asian khanates. A representative of the English Muscovy Company, he was in search of a land route to China and in 1558 he sailed down the Volga to the eastern shore of the Caspian Sea where he started on his arduous journey to the city of Urgench, the principal city of the Turkmen.
In the meantime, Turkic Muslim khanates were then established in Baku, Nakhichevan, and other areas.
The struggle between Russia and Great Britain in the late nineteenth century saw major Central Asian khanates (territories), such as Bukhara, Samarkand, and Tashkent, fall under Russian influence.
The Kazakhs were absorbed into the Russian Empire during the 18th century and the Khanates (autonomous rulers) were dissolved during the 19th century.
The tale of the victory of the Islamic hero, Timur, over the infidel Chingiz Kh[bar{s}]an also shows that the Bulghar writings represented a departure from the older Chingizid historiography of the Golden Horde and its successor khanates. This historio-graphical change reflects the economic and social loss of power among the Tatar aristocracy in the eighteenth century and the rise of the Mullahs to become the most important elite in Muslim society.
Then came the Turk khanates. In Turan, the Turks' weakening, disintegration, and invasion by the Arabs took place in the seventh century.