Key Rate

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Key Rate

An interest rate that a bank uses to determine the interest rates it charges borrowers and pays depositors. Common key rates include the fed funds rate, the fed discount rate, and the LIBOR.
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The unusual reverse in key rates will leave little room for the Bank of Korea (BOK) to maneuver, making it almost impossible to conduct a rate cut.
Prospects for import growth among Norway's trading partners is somewhat weaker than in June and expected key rates have fallen slightly.
The adjustment in key rates was kept on hold yesterday as the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) saw more stable consumer prices through 2016.
The European Central Bank (ECB) has to lower its key rates further and step up its injections of liquidity in order to combat the risk of deflation in the eurozone, say senior officials at the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
Global Banking News-October 26, 2010--Hungary central bank holds key rates steady(C)2010 ENPublishing - http://www.
Other key rates will fall as well, the central bank said.
6 August 2009 - Denmark's central bank, Nationalbanken, is likely to keep its key rates unchanged now and to cut them by 10 basis points in early September, Danske Bank forecast before today's meeting on prime rates of the European Central Bank (ECB).
Other central banks are also setting their key rates at low levels.
Signs of growing pressures in the economy will generate expectations of higher key rates, with an attendant increase in market rates.
The QPN 8505 leverages breakthroughs in the underlying quantum cryptography architecture that provide customers greater distances, higher key rates, and more reliable deployment through utilization of the decoy state architecture.
3 August 2009 - Denmark's central bank is likely to maintain its key rates, Nordea said before Nationalbanken tomorrow reports on its foreign exchange (FX) reserves for July and the European Central Bank (ECB) on Thursday holds its monthly meeting on interest rates.
European Central Bank (ECB) President Jean-Claude Trichet said Thursday that damage to European exporters from a soaring euro ''should be partly compensated for'' by an expansion of global demand, after the ECB made a widely anticipated decision to leave its key rates unchanged.