Kin

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Kin

A unit of weight in Japan equivalent to 600 grams.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They are being marketed as Windows phones but the interface of blocky windows, monochrome text and zoomed-in photos is unique to Kin, with a heavy social media slant, a custom browser based on the Zune's browser, and, surprisingly, no support for third-party apps.
KINS worked in partnership with Innovative on the implementation of the Millennium system at the POSTECH University in Pohang, Korea.
But the bigger problems in "Kin" have more to do with the script by Daniel Casey which takes implausible turns without grounding any of the action in the characters.
In Akuapem, my data suggests that kin can live up to their commitments by managing and recruiting care.
In this study, the questionnaire was filled in after the interview by the next of kin and sent back by post within 7 days.
( The confusing Kin, a Windows 7 Phone by Microsoft flustercluck branding didn't help.) The few people that did buy a Kin will still get support from Microsoft, but the future of promised software updates is up in the air."
Although the C3 lacks 3G functionality, a touchscreen, and other smartphone amenities that the KIN phones retained, it does feature Wi-Fi access.
Four major conditions emerged from the data, which identified the basis for the ACOAs' relationships to kin and fictive kin: (1) emotionally unavailable parents, (2) chaotic home, (3) lack of communication with parents, and (4) emotional distress.
Different results have been reported for permanency outcomes, and they have provided grounds for either affirming or questioning the value of kin as a placement resource for abused and neglected children (Bartholet, 1999; Link, 1996).
Stevenson (1995) described how the civil rights movement and the larger sociopolitical sensitivities led to a revisionist perspective that celebrates the female-headed household, extended family, and fictive kin traditions as cultural adaptations indicating the strength of the African American family (see particularly Billingsley, 1992; Gutman, 1976; Hill, 1971; Stack, 1974).
Families (parents and extended kin) were more likely to be permissive with boy's breaking of rules than they were with girls' breaking of rules.
Since the fall of the Soviet Union and the concomitant dissolution of the centralized state farm system, rural inhabitants have developed household and interhousehold food production capacities based on keeping cows and relying on exchange among kin. One of the basic tenets of Robert Netting's smallholder--householder theory is that in times of change, the household system is the most resilient subsistence production unit because of specific qualities including intimate ecological knowledge and implicit labor contracts.