Justice

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Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Scalia assumed, plausibly, it has something to do with the institutional responsibilities of the Chief Justiceship.
experimentar con la llegada a la Chief Justiceship del sureno Taney, el
Behind the scenes, however, a different picture emerges of Latham's chief justiceship.
The Guardian of Every Other Right: A Constitutional History of Property Rights (1992), The Chief Justiceship of Melville W.
The analysis that follows is drawn from a data-base consisting of every judicial citation in the published reasons of the SCC since January l, 2000, a period which coincides with the McLachlin Chief Justiceship.
Indeed, it was the Federalists, not the Republicans, who "pressed Adams for a full week to withdraw Marshall's name" from consideration for the Chief Justiceship.
161) Roosevelt expressed his frustration with Holmes and Day when announcing his third Supreme Court appointment (William Moody) in 1906: "I have been to bat three times on the Supreme Court justiceship business, and have struck out twice.
11) The federal judiciary possesses wide jurisdiction over the armed forces--even if judges and justices chose not to exercise that jurisdiction for many decades after the Constitution went into effect, and then to forfeit much of that jurisdiction during the Chief Justiceship of William Rehnquist.
Ross, The Chief Justiceship of Charles Evan Hughes, 1930-1941 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2007), 174.
53) Although Kinney had been serving as an Iowa supreme court justice at the time, Senator Augustus Caesar Dodge of Iowa urged him to resign and accept the chief justiceship of Utah Territory, even though it meant a reduction in salary and residence in a distant territory with extremely high living costs.
From the beginning of Dickson's Chief Justiceship to the end of December 2006, there were 432 cases with 610 separate concurrences bearing 906 judicial signatures.