Jones Act

(redirected from Jones Act of 1920)
Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

Jones Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1920, that requires ships transporting cargo between U.S. ports to fly a U.S. flag, to be owned by American citizens, and to be crewed by U.S. citizens and residents. The Act was designed to protect merchant marine jobs. The Jones Act remains controversial. Critics maintain it is protectionist and results in higher prices for consumers, while supporters contend that it helps preserve American jobs and ensures trained seamen are available in times of national emergency. It is formally called the Merchant Marine Act; its colloquial name comes from Senator Wesley Jones, who sponsored it.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, the USSB, the EFC, and the vast majority of subsidies and other programs established or reauthorized by the Jones Act of 1920 have been disestablished or replaced.
governs cabotage is the Jones Act of 1920. (25) In the United States
In the same article, Bloomberg expounded that the Jones Act of 1920 was designed "to ensure that the US has a reliable merchant marine during times of national emergency." Unfortunately, it has devolved into "a classic protectionist racket that benefits a handful of shipbuilders and a dwindling number of US mariners..." The article continued to say that the Jones Act has resulted in higher shipping costs, "that percolate throughout the economy, especially penalizing the people of Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico...The Act distorts trade flow, giving imports carried by foreign ships an edge over goods shipped from within the USA."