Jones Act


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Jones Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1920, that requires ships transporting cargo between U.S. ports to fly a U.S. flag, to be owned by American citizens, and to be crewed by U.S. citizens and residents. The Act was designed to protect merchant marine jobs. The Jones Act remains controversial. Critics maintain it is protectionist and results in higher prices for consumers, while supporters contend that it helps preserve American jobs and ensures trained seamen are available in times of national emergency. It is formally called the Merchant Marine Act; its colloquial name comes from Senator Wesley Jones, who sponsored it.
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"Buckley") was unquestionably a Jones Act seaman working for
He represents clients in a broad range of disputes, with a concentration on maritime personal injury/death and oilfield defense, including claims under General Maritime Law, the Jones Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act.
coastwise trade under the Jones Act. The Bareboat Charter extends for 10 years, into 2029.
President Donald Trump authorized only a 10-day waiver of the Jones Act - not long enough for some foreign-owned ships to bring much-needed aid.
Puerto Rico's post-hurricane plight has drawn attention to the Jones Act, the 1920 law that compels all maritime commerce between US ports to be carried on ships built, owned and crewed by Americans.
"The Jones Act only requires all cargo moving from one US port to another US port (including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico) be borne in a US-flag vessel whose crew is at least made up of 75 percent US citizens, whose vessel is built in a US shipyard, is registered in the US, is managed by US citizens, and is majority (at least 75 percent) owned by US citizens.
The federal government has been reluctant to do that, however, despite boasts to the contrary by the president, dragging its feet even on matters such as suspending the Jones Act, which would allow relief supplies to be shipped on foreign-flagged vessels at a much lower cost than U.S.
Trump, at the request of PuertoRican Governor Ricardo Rossello, "has authorised the Jones Act be waived for PuertoRico.
It is doubtful that the original sponsors or the current defenders of the Jones Act intended to create conditions that would increase the dangers faced by American seamen, but that has been the result.
The completion of West Virginia and its sister ships demonstrates our belief in the Jones Act trade, and our commitment to supporting our economy through U.S.
He was also a resident commissioner to the United States where he was instrumental in the passage of the Jones Act in 1916 which provided for the grant of Philippine independence.
In order to present a uniformed approach on issues involving the Jones Act, the U.S.