joint ownership

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Related to Jointly-Held Property: Jointly Owned Property

Joint Ownership

A situation in which two or more persons co-own a property. In other words, if two or more persons jointly own a property and one of them dies, the property does not become part of a decedent's estate; rather, the other owner(s) continue to own the property. A married couple may jointly own their house, for example. Likewise, two business partners may jointly own a business property. If two persons own an apartment complex and one of them dies, the whole of the complex belongs to the co-owner, and not the decedent's heirs. However, the decedent's liabilities may remain attached to this property and may be used to pay off creditors, even if the creditor had nothing to do with the property in question.

joint ownership

Ownership of an asset, such as property, by two or more parties. Joint ownership of property has advantages and disadvantages compared with individual ownership. For example, the property automatically passes to the co-owners upon the death of one of the other owners. Also, with one type of joint ownership, one owner can sell the property without the permission of the other owners. See also joint tenancy with right of survivorship, tenancy by the entirety, tenancy in common.

joint ownership

Ownership of property by two or more people or entities. It includes tenants in common,joint tenants with right of survivorship,tenants by the entireties,and community property interests.

References in periodicals archive ?
The gift tax consequences associated with joint tenancy and tenancy by the entirety interests again depend upon how the joint tenancy is created (e.g., whether the jointly-held property is acquired by gift or inheritance from a third party or whether the co-tenants create the joint tenancy) and whether the joint tenants are husband and wife or other persons.
The income tax consequences associated with jointly-held property generally depend upon whether the co-owners are husband and wife.
In general, income from jointly-held property is taxed in proportion to the income each tenant is entitled to receive pursuant to local law.
Note that the rules concerning income on jointly-held property can provide some planning opportunities.
But, in the case of interest and taxes, co-owners can deduct interest and taxes which they have paid on jointly-held property as long as no other tenant has claimed a deduction from such items.
Jointly-held property may be particularly vulnerable to loss in the case of divorce.