Job Lock


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Job Lock

A situation in which an employee wants to quit his/her job, but is unable to because he/she is afraid of losing health insurance or other employee benefits. A job lock may hold back one's career or, just as seriously, one's personal satisfaction at work.
References in periodicals archive ?
But as Sitaraman and Alstott note, "public options can benefit the private sector." They can create a more fluid labor market by providing health insurance and retirement coverage that individuals can take with them from one employer to another, thus easing "job lock." They can also introduce more competition into concentrated markets.
The ACA also enabled many Americans to consider entrepreneurship by ending the disincentive known as "job lock," which kept many Americans in jobs they didn't want because they feared losing their health insurance.
In addition, the plan would do away with "job lock" because limits on the availability of insurance would be eliminated for those with pre-existing conditions, he said.
This method echoes an identification approach used in the previous literature that found substantial evidence of job lock in the early 1990s.
This reluctance to change jobs for fear of losing employer-sponsored health insurance is known as the job lock effect, and is seen as a flaw in the employer-based health insurance system.
An interesting side effect of the Affordable Care Act, says Jason Stevenson, education and communication director for the Utah Health Policy Project, is the way in which the law is able to effectively address "job lock."
older selfemployed individuals are switching to wage-earning jobs, fewer, younger baby boomers (those at 55) are choosing self-employment and the high cost of health insurance is creating a job lock where individuals are hesitant to leave jobs that provide health insurance.
The United States has been unique among industrialized nations in tying insurance and employment closely, said labor economist Craig Garthwaite of Northwestern University, who co-authored a frequently cited study on how the health law may break what's known as ''job lock.''
Democrats said the study showed that the health care law would free many Americans from "job lock," the concept that people stay in one job for fear of losing their health benefits.
Two of these fatalities could have been prevented by disconnecting the power and assuring it is off, having each miner on the job lock the power source in the safe position, using his or her personal safety lock and tag to prevent the power from being reenergized.
States can choose whether to keep or kill the arrangements they have been using to prevent health insurance-related job lock.
When employees are unable to adapt and remain in their unsatisfactory work situation in the long run, they can fall into job lock (become stuck in their job).