Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey


Also found in: Acronyms.

Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey

A survey published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics each month on the state of the American job market. It collects and disseminates data on job openings, recruitment activity, hires and layoffs, and other criteria in several different sectors. JOLTS are used along with the Help Wanted Index to show whether the number of jobs is growing or shrinking at a given time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, May 2006.
Source: Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey and Current Employment Statistics survey, U.S.
The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) is a monthly survey that produces data on job openings, hires, and separations.
Data from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) reflect the continued impact that the recession which began in December 2007 (according to the National Bureau of Economic Research (1)) has had on the demand for labor and worker flows.
(2) Data from the job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) (3) also reflect a labor market slowdown in 2007, as job openings--a measure of labor demand--and hires and separations--measures of worker flows--decreased over the year.
Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) is an establishment survey that publishes monthly data on job openings, as well as monthly and annual data on hires and separations, by major industry and region.
The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) was introduced to readers of this Review in our December 2001 issue.
(2) For additional information about the development of the program, see Kelly Clark and Rosemary Hyson, "New tools for labor market analysis: the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey," Monthly Labor Review, December 2001, pp.
Hall uses data from the BLS Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) to test the model against labor force developments in 2001 and 2002.
The Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank included in their April 2003 Economic Trends bulletin an analysis of the new data from the BLS Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) that illustrated that fact.
A new Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) was introduced in July 2002 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.