Job Market

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Job Market

The supply and demand for jobs. That is, the job market is the amount of job openings available compared to the workforce capable of taking them. A large number of job openings may indicate lack of demand for jobs (that is, there are not enough skilled workers to fill available positions), while the opposite may indicate few jobs relative to the labor force.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's also close to the roughly 4 million job openings each month that are consistent with healthier job markets.
Synopsis: Energy- and commodity-producing states along with federal government states dominated the 10 states with the best job markets in 2010, based on Gallup's Job Creation Index.
The class of '98 is graduating into one of the best job markets in decades, with recruiters lining up and employers paying well, say college officials and economic observers.
When describing the high-end job markets in their cities:
Synopsis: More than half of the 10 best job markets in 2010 are energy- and commodity-producing states.
com's Quarterly Executive Job Market Trends Report for Q308, which tracks hiring patterns in 20 major cities and surveys in-the-trenches job seekers nationwide, the executive job markets in San Francisco, San Diego, Washington, D.
However, undeterred by the economic slow-down, 58 percent of those surveyed described the high-end job markets in their cities as stable and 59 percent said they expect to land a new job in six months or less.
Synopsis: The fourth in Gallup's "State of the States" series reveals that, according to employee reports, energy and farm states had the best job markets while housing-crash, financial-debacle, and manufacturing states had the worst job markets in 2008.
Despite that negative signal, a 53 percent majority described the high-end job markets in their cities as either "stable" or "somewhat stable" and 65 percent said it will take less than 6 months to find a new job, an improvement over the results seen in TheLadders.
com's Quarterly Executive Job Market Trends Report measured hiring activity across a variety of metrics and found the hottest $100,000+ job markets to be New York, San Francisco, Boston, Seattle and Chicago.
Although the majority of job-seekers cited the stability of the high-end job markets in their cities, many believe that they would be better able to reach their career goals elsewhere.