Job Jumper

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Job Jumper

A person who changes jobs repeatedly in a relatively brief period of time. Companies frequently shy away from hiring job jumpers because job jumping may indicate that the applicant has an inability to commit to a single career, has difficulties with co-workers, or has some other impediment to being a good employee. A job jumper is also called a job hopper.
References in periodicals archive ?
This bucks the prevailing stereotype which suggests that Gen Y employees are likely to be job hoppers with poor organizational loyalty.
Many industries are experiencing the brain drain and find themselves competing for the same highly skilled individuals who could become loyal employees rather than job hoppers if they see clear career paths within their organizations.
What we guard against is job hoppers, or people who just chase money," Taylor says.
According to an article published in Forbes, job hoppers typically leave a company for a lateral move or promotion.
The employees too have changed with some of them behaving like mercenary job hoppers.
They may be job hoppers, but they demonstrate a strong work ethic in each job.
In addition to year end, April is usually a month featuring lower unemployment rate, as job hoppers appearing during the Chinese Lunar New Year have settled down and prospective first-time job seekers are still in school.
For example, we're thinking of people who've had several jobs in the last few years and who, in a recession, would be firmly rejected as job hoppers.
Job hoppers are usually less appealing unless there is steady advancement.
If NCMA doesn't take the emerging attitudes seriously, we will see "group hoppers," much like what traditional employers have considered job hoppers to be.
IF YOU READ OUR most recent comprehensive look at the world of work (see "The Future is Now," February 2000), you know that the labor market is in top form and that job hoppers hold the lion's share of power to negotiate top-notch employment packages.
People who try new opportunities aren't necessarily seen as job hoppers anymore, but rather as risk takers.