Jihad

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Jihad

A religious obligation for Muslims. The word is Arabic for "struggle," though its technical meaning has been disputed. Historically, many scholars have argued that jihad primarily entails a struggle against one's base instincts. However, it was used both in the Quran and by rulers of some Muslim-majority countries to justify war, whether to end persecution of Muslims or to provide religious grounds for conquest. The meaning of the term remains controversial, though some groups, notably al-Qaida, emphasize its militant element.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given this delimitation of asymmetric conflict, jihadism manifests itself to the U.S.
that Salafist jihadism is spreading among the young generation," he said.
Overall, the Arab Spring delivered a heavy blow to jihadism and significantly undermined its rationale (that armed militancy is the most effective and most legitimate tool for change).
In this paper, terrorism is treated as the overarching concept under which a number of categories exist, such as "Islamist extremism," "violent Jihadism," and "violent extremist organizations;" the latter of which is the standard terminology that the U.S.
So it will be a while before this scourge is eliminated in totality-but first, let's stop calling it jihadism as it is nothing else but terrorism.
The sad truth is that governments, law enforcement, security forces, intellectuals and journalists do not have an ideological response to political violence's latest reiteration, jihadism. Moreover, the struggle against political violence, is not one that is predominantly ideological.
Islamism and jihadism are on the rampage playing out all over the world and literally tearing out the hearts of innocent people, many of them Muslims, while we allow it to happen in the name of multiculturalism.
In his speech at the Munich Security Conference last week COAS Bajwa described the present jihadism as a misnomer.
Shoukry, who was the speaker at the session on countering terrorism entitled Jihadism Afterthe Caliphate, said that the time of the Islamic State group (IS)'s rule is far from the noble idea of jihad and its positive meanings, stressing that it is impossible to link the terror group to the age of the Islamic Caliphate which "lit the way for the humanity."
The COAS said that Pakistan has denied the Islamic State militant group any foothold in the country.He was delivering his speech on "Jihadism After Caliphate" along with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi.
"The UAE identified the threat of Islamist and jihadist extremism early on, in the 1980s, when we took steps to curb it," he added, stressing the necessity to "shut down state support for extremism, jihadism and terrorism across the Arab world."
"The UAE identified the threat of Islamist and jihadist extremism early on, in the 1980s, when we took steps to curb it," he added, stressing the necessity to "shut down state support for extremism, jihadism and terrorism across the Arab world." He indicated that the current crisis is not principally about Iran, though the country will try to benefit from Qatar's behaviour, the UAE News Agency (WAM) reported.