Jeffrey K. Skilling

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Jeffrey K. Skilling

A businessman who served as President of Enron. He worked for Enron periodically starting in 1987. Skilling adopted the strategy in which Enron itself did not possess any assets; he also adopted mark to market accounting. In 2006, he was convicted of insider trading, securities fraud, and other crimes. See also: Enron scandal, Kenneth Lay.
References in periodicals archive ?
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH DISGRACED ENRON CHIEF REGISTERS NEW COMPANY The disgraced former Enron chief executive Jeffrey Skilling has wasted little time in relaunching his career after serving more than 12 years in jail.
One key Enron executive died as the result of an apparent suicide, and former CEOs Jeffrey Skilling and Ken Lay were both convicted on charges of conspiracy and fraud.
On the other hand, 18 years is more than Jeffrey Skilling's 14-year sentence for defrauding Enron investors and employees.
As such, the book expressly looks at creativity and resourceful criminals--namely the likes of Bernie Madoff, Jeffrey Skilling, or Osama Bin Laden--to expand the way we look at crime and gain more understanding into (1) the dark side of creativity, (2) how the dark side of creativity is used to create new ways to achieve negative results, (3) the creative aspects of crime, and (4) how this knowledge can enhance law enforcement's response to crime.
Something I've particularly admired about the United States: The way the authorities took in Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling, the founder and CEO of Enron respectively, is a lesson in how to do things professionally, without fuss.
Other black marks against the company are natural gas trader Enron, which was headed by McKinsey alum Jeffrey Skilling (who would eventually be sentenced to 24 years in federal prison) when it rather spectacularly imploded in 2001; and the more recent Galleon Group insider trading scandal that resulted in the arrests and convictions of McKinsey senior executives Rajat Gupta and Anil Kumar.
It could just be four more years for Jeffrey Skilling.
He saw that top executives were unloading their stock holdings and that the skipper, Jeffrey Skilling, was abandoning ship.
He writes, "Something had gone wrong for some of them along the way: Their personal relationships had begun to deteriorate, even as their professional prospects blossomed." He gives one charming example: Jeffrey Skilling. Skilling was earning more than $100 million in a single year.
Among its inmates is Jeffrey Skilling, the former head of Enron who is serving tome for his role in the firm's financial scandal.
While Bruno's appeal was pending, the Supreme Court ruled in its case against former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling that the honest services statute only criminalizes bribes and kickbacks.