JM

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JM

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for JAMAICA.

JM

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for Jamaica. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Jamaican bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Jamaica. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Jamaica. Each Jamaican parish has its own code with the prefix "JM." For example, the code for the Parish of Hanover is ISO 3166-2:JM-09.
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References in classic literature ?
Two minutes later he was in the office of an important magazine, and there was a look of relief on the editor's face, for James had practically promised to do a series of twelve short stories for him.
Acting on this excellent plan, James, being off duty for an hour after tea, smoked a pipe in his bedroom and settled down to work on a second effort for the Universal.
"My name is James Williams, of Cloverdale, Missouri," he said kindly, so that they would not be too greatly mortified.
James Williams's wife--his bride of two weeks--looked him in the face with a strange, soft radiance in her eyes and a flush on her cheeks, looked him in the face and said:
I had about two guineas left; Alan's belt having been despatched by another hand, that trusty messenger had no more than seventeen-pence to his whole fortune; and as for James, it appears he had brought himself so low with journeys to Edinburgh and legal expenses on behalf of the tenants, that he could only scrape together three-and-five-pence-halfpenny, the most of it in coppers.
"Ye must find a safe bit somewhere near by," said James, "and get word sent to me.
"There--there's a little dawg," said James, looking frightfully guilty.
She told Pitt he might come to dinner, and insisted that James should accompany her in her drive, and paraded him solemnly up and down the cliff, on the back seat of the barouche.
"No, that is too hard," said Sir James, in a tone of reproach that showed strong interest.
"Exactly," said Sir James. "You give up from some high, generous motive."
Prince James then tells of his past life, of how, when he was a lad, his father sent him across the sea in a ship, and of how he was taken prisoner and found himself in "Straight ward and strong prison" "without comfort in sorrow." And there full often he bemoaned his fate, asking what crime was his that he should be shut up within four walls when other men were free.
James Harthouse, throwing away the last small remnant of the cigar he had now smoked out.