J-1 Visa

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J-1 Visa

A visa allowing one to stay in the United States for cultural or business exchange. Many times, a J-1 visa is issued for work purposes or for training, such as an internship or schooling. In order to be eligible for a J-1 visa, one must receive sponsorship from a government or private entity. One must leave the United States within 30 days of the visa's expiration.
References in periodicals archive ?
As American hospitals face doctor shortages, this important legislation will increase healthcare access across the country by eliminating the persistent backlog of J-1 Visas," said Emmer.
J-1 visa is a non-immigrant visa issued by the United States to exchange visitors participating in programs that promote cultural exchange, especially to obtain medical or business training within the U.
She said the resort will try to extend the J-1 visa to those students that have completed their studies and can work for 12 months instead of a matter of weeks.
The use of J-1 visa waivers remains a major means of providing physicians to practice in underserved areas of the United States.
residency training programs obtain a J-1 visa, which usually expires when residency training is finished.
They may contest the refusal by asking to see the "Evidence Manual" present in all Social Security Administration offices; this manual states that non-resident aliens with J-1 visas are supposed to receive social security numbers.
Yet, earlier this year many of us were concerned with the number of international camp counselors being denied J-1 visas.
It's a great opportunity to interview students in a comfortable environment and learn about all the benefits of hiring students with J-1 visas.
The first legal au pairs entered the country 19 years ago with J-1 visas issued by the U.
with legal, J-1 visas and provide 45 hours a week child care.
Au Pair in America is a government-designated program; the young Europeans come to the United States legally with J-1 visas.
Kalpana, who was finishing the same Texas residency program, applied for her J-1 visa waiver on March 1, the very day that the USDA suspended its involvement in the waiver program (INTERNAL MEDICINE NEWS, June 15, 2002, p.