Tick

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Tick

Refers to the minimum change in price a security can have, either up or down. Related: Point.

Tick

On an exchange, a trade in which a security was traded after another trade. There are three basic types of tick. A plus tick occurs when the price is higher than the previous trade. A minus tick occurs when the price is lower, and finally a zero tick happens when the price is the same. Ticks are recorded and published in real time throughout a trading day. Certain regulations govern the types of trade that can occur after certain kinds of ticks. See also: Zero-plus Tick, Zero-minus Tick.

TICK

A short-term technical indicator that describes the difference between the number of stocks whose last sale occurred on an uptick and the number of stocks whose last sale occurred on a downtick. A high positive TICK is generally considered a short-term signal of a strong market. Contrarians consider a high positive TICK to have bearish implications.

tick

A movement in the price or price quotation of a security or contract. See also downtick, minimum tick, uptick.

Tick.

A tick is the minimum movement by which the price of a security, option, or index changes.

With stocks, a tick may be little as one cent. With US Treasury securities, the smallest increment is 1/32 of a point, or 31.25 cents.

An uptick represents an increase over the last different price, and a downtick a drop from the last different price.

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