Itinerant Worker

Itinerant Worker

A person who moves from place to place to find a job. An itinerant worker is not confined to a single place and often does not own property. Itinerant workers are most common in sectors with a large number of temporary jobs or a high degree of seasonality. For example, an itinerant worker may be an agricultural worker who moves between two regions with slightly different growing seasons. The number of itinerant workers may increase during recessions or other times with low levels of job security.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was born with the name Joel Hagglund in Sweden in 1879 and emigrated to the US in 1902, finding sporadic employment as an itinerant worker right across the country, from New York to California.
We found he was living in Sheffield, so whether he settled there or was there as an itinerant worker, I don't know.
Sly, indeed, is portrayed as an itinerant worker, a phenomenon that was becoming increasingly common in England by the end of the sixteenth century.
With the help of an itinerant worker and a blind boarder, Edna Spalding (Sally Field) struggles to keep her family together during the enormous hardships of the 1930s.
Theoretically, residents are not allowed to work while there, yet the authorities turn a blind eye when the odd pick-up truck comes to collect an itinerant worker for a day.
Wang is the kind of itinerant worker found in China by the millions, wandering from city to city in these boom years, and so it was chance that brought him home two days before the earthquake.
The mass migrations of the 1930s were something of a last gasp for the itinerant worker and the wandering agitator, both of whom would be increasingly rare in the postwar world.
Dad sharecropped the Oklahoma farms, and later tried the California fruit harvests as an itinerant worker traveling up and down the state,'' Bill says.
Originally published in 1906, Under the Autumn Star is a comic novel narrated by an itinerant worker, Knut Pedersen.
Dr Tooms's research has uncovered fresh evidence that Pheidias, the Greek sculptor of the Parthenon Marbles was not in fact Greek at all, but an itinerant worker of British extraction named Philip Davies who settled in Athens around 453 and who changed his name to Pheidias in order to insinuate himself into Athenian social and artistic circles.
The Tablet is mainly attributed to reporters, reporting technicians, production managers and other itinerant workers.