Zionism

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Related to Israeli nationalism: Sionist

Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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Thus, the drama of Israeli nationalism and homeland cannot be understood apart from the particular ways in which the nation form has operated on some kind of complex, prenational Jewish identity, as well as a rich, non-Israeli Jewish identity.
Each stage has been saturated with ambiguities and ambivalence, as we have seen with the influence of Israeli nationalism and the construction of the 'good Arab'.
I saw Gush as reflecting the "traditionalization" of Israeli nationalism, a sort of unraveling of the modern and primordial elements of Zionist ideology, with the latter gaining ascendance.(22) More recently, Gideon Aran has invoked the notion of traditionalizing in more evocative terms.
But there is a continuity of concern with alternative paths of life, especially for Diaspora Jews, like the author, confronted with a vigorous Israeli nationalism. People drawn to the famous creative writer orbit him in somewhat the same way (and are) characters had been projected into alternatives by the character of Zuckerman.
Paz said she doesn't see this May as being a time to celebrate Israeli nationalism, and instead called on people who "think like her" to do more to challenge a government she described as "almost fascist".
Israeli Nationalism: Social Conflicts and the Politics of Knowledge, by Uri Ram.
Several analysts view the Muslim Brotherhood as being a minority in Egypt, and the Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg, traditionally against Israeli nationalism, recently opined that "There is ultimately no alternative to freedom and self-government," even if it means that a radical Muslim group will control Egypt.
Is Israeli nationalism facing an internal existential threat so severe that the educational system must do everything it can to withhold knowledge from the very bearers of nationalism?
They find that class does not seem to figure as much in Israeli nationalism than in that of other countries, that identity is a complex element of Israeli life, and that often one's origins elsewhere in the world determine one's community and one's place in Israeli society, creating a very elaborate sociocultural framework.

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