Contraction

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Contraction

In a business cycle, the time between the peak and the bottom. That is, a contraction occurs between the end of economic growth and the end of the subsequent recession. Contractions are characterized by layoffs, a decline in GDP, and other negative factors. However, historically, contractions have tended not to last as long as expansions.
References in periodicals archive ?
At each session, participants were first required to perform three maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) for 5 seconds each, with a 5-minute rest between contractions.
An isometric contraction was performed by the subject for each part of the trial.
Merletti, "Repeatability of Surface EMG Variables during Voluntary Isometric Contractions of the Biceps Brachii Muscle", Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, Elsevier, vol.
The surface EMG of the extensor carpi radialis, the extensor digitorum and the superficial flexor digitorum were recorded during maximum and sub-maximal isometric contractions of five seconds in flexion and extension of the wrist.
Based on the early research it was reported that isometric strength gains of 5% per week occurred when healthy subjects performed a single, near-maximal isometric contraction everyday over a 6-week period.7
After the electrode positioning, the students were prepared for the maximum voluntary isometric contraction test.
Traditional manual muscle testing requires an isometric contraction. Isometric contractions can significantly increase arterial blood pressure.
(36) Clark et al (37) therefore submitted that the sex difference observed during isometric contraction was not influenced by torso length, as there was no significant relationship between torso length and endurance time.
This study examined whether arm position and muscle activity affect the duration of an isometric contraction. The authors discovered that overhead isometric contractions of the arm required less effort and induced less hemodynamic stress than waist level contractions.
Isometric contraction occurs when muscles are loaded while stationary (e.g., two hands pushing against each other).
One end of the aorta was attached to a force-displacement transducer (Kishimoto UM-203) so that its isometric contraction could be recorded (NEC RECHI HORIZ-8 K, Tokyo, Japan).