bull

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Bull

An investor who thinks the market will rise. Related: Bear.

Bull

1. An investor who believes that the market or a security will rise and makes investment decisions accordingly. See also: Bear.

2. Informal for bull market.

bull

An investor who believes the price of a particular security or security prices in general will follow a broad upward trend. An investor can often be a bull on a specific security but not on the general market, and vice versa. Compare bear.

bull

a person who buys a financial security (stock, share, foreign currency, etc.) in expectation that its market price is likely to rise. See SPECULATION. Compare BEAR.

bull

a person who expects future prices in a STOCK EXCHANGE or COMMODITY MARKET to rise and who seeks to make money by buying shares or commodities. Compare BEAR. See SPOT MARKET, FUTURES MARKET, BULL MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
In arguing against the specificity of Irish bulls the Edgeworths might be taken to project an assimilationist or universalist stance, suggesting that there's nothing that sets the Irish apart from, say, the English.
If for no other reason, this kind of preservation of dialect and idioms makes Irish Bulls worthy of study for scholars of nineteenth-century literature and culture.
Together with "The Hibernian Medicant", "Bath Coach Conversation" and "The Irish Incognito"; "Little Dominick" is one of the four chapter-length prose national allegories in Irish Bulls, where the Edgeworths weaken the political allegory by introducing a Catholic child's experiences in a boarding school, based on those of Richard Lovell Edgeworth himself (Butler 1999-2003: 327-328, vol.
Agriculture Minister Brendan Smith welcomed the opening up of China and claimed Irish bulls were the best in the world.
A chapter on Irish bulls shows entertainingly how the blunder, element (seen by the English as Irishisms) has been used for creative contradictions by writers both English and Irish.

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