Sterilization

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Sterilization

A method by which a central bank may affect the value of the domestic currency relative to a foreign currency. To weaken the domestic currency, sterilization involves selling the domestic currency on the forex market and buying the foreign currency. This increases the supply of the domestic currency, while reducing the supply of the foreign. To strengthen the domestic currency, sterilization involves the opposite. A central bank usually conducts sterilization to counteract adverse changes to the domestic currency in foreign exchange markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
For an overview of involuntary sterilization in California prisons see Alex Lee, Robin Levi, and Chivy Sok, Human Rights Violations against Women of Color in the United States: A Report on U.
abortion or involuntary sterilization, a determination has only been
Hungary, a case that involved the involuntary sterilization of a Hungarian woman of Roma origin, the CEDAW Committee found that the failure to provide the woman with reproductive health information and to ensure that A.
Following the amendment to the refugee definition by the IIRIRA, the BIA and several circuits have debated the scope of section 601(a) and whether it extends to individuals who had not personally endured a forced abortion or involuntary sterilization.
Both genders were subject to involuntary sterilization, while women were also more likely to submit to voluntary sterilization.
It has also been argued that the eugenics program in America is still alive in some form, and continues to this day with the involuntary sterilization of some hereditary flawed and mentally disabled people, including mental patients; but clearly this matter is being avoided, or simply ignored by some state governments.
Today, there is wide agreement among historians that eugenics was used to design and justify state-sanctioned atrocities, from the involuntary sterilization of thousands of working-class women in California and 32 other states (Ibid.
Bell, in which the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 that involuntary sterilization was constitutional.
Anyone the state considered socially undesirable appeared subject to involuntary sterilization, including: individuals with hereditary deafness or blindness, those considered to have mental illness or developmental disabilities, individuals with epilepsy, criminals, prostitutes, or the poor (Larson, 2002; Lombardo, 2003).
In the 1970s, mainland feminists, reflecting a new awareness of the effects of race and poverty, began to denounce involuntary sterilization while they continued to fight for access to abortion and birth control.
The political cover for these sorry shenanigans comes from the 1984 Kemp-Kasten bill, which authorizes withholding of funds if an agency ``supports or participates'' in coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization.
Bell case affirming the constitutionality of the Virginia involuntary sterilization law.