Invisible Transaction

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Invisible Transaction

An exchange in which a service is traded across international borders and money changes hands, but in which no tangible assets are traded. An example of an invisible transaction is a consulting service offered to a client in a different country. Invisible transactions are included as invisible items when calculating a country's balance of payments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Visa SVP of Innovation and Strategic Partnerships Shiv Singh shared a similar vision, mentioning the need for invisible transactions, a frictionless consumer experience and equal support for brand awareness, product development and innovation as keys to success.
The balance of 40 per cent should be used to meet other trade obligations, visible and invisible transactions.
The CBN announced relaxed measures the same day following its Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting: foreign exchange bought on the interbank market and biweekly auctions could now only be used for 'funding of letters of credit, bills for collection and other invisible transactions," and bureaux de change would be restricted from access.
Reforms have included: (1) liberalisation of invisible transactions in 1997, leading to current account convertibility; (2) recapitalisation of state banks to reach an 8% capital adequacy ratio by 1999; (3) creation of treasury bill and bond markets which have expanded; (4) privatisation of state-owned companies; (5) continued efforts to cut tariffs; (6) elimination of profit margin controls in the pharmaceuticals industry by 1998; (7) cuts in public spending and reform of the civil service, aimed at generating a budget surplus; and (8) reform of the agricultural sector, including privatisation of land, backed by a World Bank structural adjustment loan (see background in Vol.
The balance of 40 per cent should be used to meet trade obligations, visible and invisible transactions.
Reforms have included: (1) liberalisation of invisible transactions in 1997, leading to current account convertibility; (2) recapitalisation of state banks to reach an 8% capital adequacy ratio by 1999; (3) creation of treasury bill and bond market; (4) privatisations of state-owned companies; (5) continued efforts to cut tariffs; (6) elimination of profit margin controls in the pharmaceutical industry by 1998; (7) cuts in public spending and reform of the civil service, aimed at generating a budget surplus; and (8) reform of the agricultural sector, including privatisation of land, supported by a World Bank structural adjustment loan (see background in Vol.