negligence

(redirected from Intervening cause)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Intervening cause: Superseding cause

negligence

A breach in the performance of a legal duty,proximately resulting in harm to another. Central to the concept of negligence is the problem of determining the exact duty owed.For example, does one owe any duties of care regarding the condition of property so as not to injure trespassers? If there is no duty,there can be no negligence,no matter how sloppy and careless the act.

Negligence

A lack of such reasonable care and caution as would be expected of a prudent person. A penalty may be assessed if any part of an underpayment of tax is due to negligent or intentional disregard of rules and regulations.
References in periodicals archive ?
intervening cause to determine whether it is a superseding cause
intervening cause if and only if (1) it is an event, not a state or an
Given the Supreme Court's pronouncement that an intervening cause is unforeseeable only if it constitutes "an improbable freak," McCain v.
This failure to coordinate with the military was the 'efficient intervening cause' that only proved Purisima and Napenas' negligence in the planning, preparation and actual implementation of Oplan Exodus, the Ombudsman said.
An intervening cause is one that arises after a defendant's negligent act and is not foreseeable.(13) Foreseeable intervening forces are within the scope of the original risk and, thus, within the scope of the defendant's negligence.
* There also must be the establishment of proximate cause, that which, in a natural and continuous sequence, unbroken by any efficient intervening cause, produced the injury and without which the result would not have occurred.
Instruction 403.10c12c (intervening cause) is to be given only in cases in which the court concludes that there is a jury issue as to the presence and effect of an intervening cause.
* Blend that defense with other strong arguments: no defect, no negligence, thorough warnings about the statistical possibility of adverse outcomes, intervening cause of the injury, and so on.
Instruction 403.10c (intervening cause) is to be given only in cases in which the court concludes that there is a jury issue as to the presence and effect of an intervening cause.
If an intervening cause exists, there is no liability.
Is there evidence that shows a player lost value in the draft because of the injury or are there other intervening causes? Consider the many off-field issues that plague some players.