International Law


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International Law

The area of law dealing with relations between countries. International law consists of many aspects, both written and unwritten, but often refers to matters of war and peace, respect for human rights, international trade and commerce, and similar things. Institutions like the United Nations and the International Criminal Court purport to enforce international law, though their effectiveness is limited by the cooperation given by member states. In general, international law is governed by treaties between sovereign states.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Constituent Audience Hypothesis relies on two assumptions: that the conventional wisdom about Americans' opinion of international law is exaggerated or wrong, and that members of Congress know this and respond accordingly out of political interest.
Third and finally, the Foreign Audience Hypothesis also posits that international law considerations have a vibrant role during the creation of domestic statutes, but it assumes an altogether different audience for this discourse.
He also shared experiences from his work with some students who were sensitized on international law.
In international law between sovereign states, however, one state is not in a legally dominant or authoritative position over the other, so they are considered to be equal and have a horizontal structure, such as in international treaties.
The binding force of such vertical international law subjects the states and other actors in the international community to a legal rule independent of their expressed content.
He stressed Qatar's keenness to provide financial support for the programme in order to overcome the chronic financial difficulties, as well as its keenness to involve the largest number of Qataris in the programme courses in the framework of building legal capacity and raising awareness of the importance international law.
It is widely accepted as a starting point--at least by practitioners--that the sources of public international law are those listed in Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice (ICJ).
It has sometimes been suggested that the importance of customary international law is now greatly reduced as so much is regulated by treaty.
The President's Secretariat and the Prime Minister's Secretariat also lack in-house legal capacity on international law to advise them or to approve their speeches or clear their statements in international law; this latter is of particular significance as statements made by the heads of state constitute state practice under international law.
This is the principle that for a practice to become a rule of customary international law, it must be shown that nations believe that international law mandates the practice.
What makes this volume even more valuable and worth reading is the fact that it includes different views of the authors on similar issues, which will help scholars and practitioners benefits from a very comprehensive panorama of the controversies in international law.
In the final analysis, international law may rest on a handful of weak international institutions, given that no international legislature or executive exists (with the very limited exception of the United Nations Security Council).

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