International Accounting Standards


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

International Accounting Standards

A former system for standardizing accounting practices across the world. International Accounting Standards were issued by the International Accounting Standards Committee. Though it had no authority to enforce its rulings, a number of countries followed its guidelines anyway. In 2001, the IAS were replaced by the International Financial Reporting Standards.

International Accounting Standards

see ACCOUNTING STANDARDS.
References in periodicals archive ?
De acuerdo con el International Accounting Standards Committee Foundation (2010), en el MC se define la medicion como el proceso de determinacion de los importes monetarios por los que se reconocen y llevan contablemente los elementos de los estados financieros, para su inclusion en el Estado de Situacion Financiera y en el Estado de Resultados.
In respect of using IAS for company tax purposes, TEI is pleased to submit the following written comments on the Consultation Document, The application of International Accounting Standards (IAS) in 2005 and the implications for the introduction of a consolidated tax base for companies' EU-wide activities issued in February 2003 ("Consultation Document").
During Murphy's career, most individuals failed to realize the need for international accounting standards. In this time before international accounting standards obtained acceptance in the accounting profession, Murphy enthusiastically supported their development and educated others on their benefits and how to overcome their impediments.
The cross-fertilization that's going on is the result of an agreement between the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) to make their existing financial reporting standards compatible with each other to better respond to the complexity of the world's markets (See "The Urge to Converge," page 70).
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) issued by the London-based International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).
Debate between the London-based International Accounting Standards Board and insurance trade groups, and between both and the European Commission--the EU's executive body--heated up last year to the point where, early this year, the IASB decided to put off bringing insurance contracts into the fold until it has time to explore more fully the implications of IFRS for insurers.
Two years ago, the International Accounting Standards Board was a mere benchwarmer in the standards-setting game.
The International Accounting Standards Committee Foundation (IASCF) is launching a programme to help accountants prepare financial statements under international accounting standards in the run-up to the 2005 implementation deadline (see "Clarity begins at home, FM February 2002).
On July 9, the International Accounting Standards Board issued its International Financial Reporting Standard for Small and Medium Entities (IFRS for SMEs).
In a letter to Sir David Tweedie, chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), the Commission stated that "in the short term, an urgent need for further guidance in the application of fair value' in illiquid markets was identified, notably on the use of the mark-to-market model".
Indeed, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and over 100 countries around the world that have adopted IASB standards embrace the same view.
The invitation is part of a joint project through which FASB and the International Accounting Standards Board are working to converge and improve their respective guidance frameworks, which FASB's staff believes do not adequately address either probability or uncertainty related to assets and liabilities.

Financial browser ?
Full browser ?