Insurance Score

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Insurance Score

A way of measuring the risk a potential policyholder poses to an insurance company. The insurance score is a numerical value and measures factors such as the number of claims the potential policyholder has made in the past. A higher score indicates that the potential policyholder poses little risk, is unlikely to make many claims, and is unlikely to make frivolous ones. As a result, one with a high insurance score pays a lower premium than one with a low insurance score.
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LexisNexis continues to enhance the platform and expand data sets, resulting in next generation credit attributes and insurance scores to provide a more granular view of a consumers information and risk.
Insurers have been using credit-based insurance scores as part of the underwriting decision for more than two decades.
Most insurers use credit-based insurance scores, which use information from credit reports to help set premiums for auto, homeowners and renters policies.
As a result, the industry made huge segmentation gains from the creation of insurance scores based on the resident (or owner's) credit.
Diarmuid Murtagh reduced Roscommon's arrears to just two with a free but Eoin Cleary eased Clare through with a couple of late insurance scores.
Toher's ninth converted free of the afternoon and another for veteran Stephen Clynch provided Meath's insurance scores.
But this may soon change, says Bazhaf, because a major new but still unpublished study shreds the argument behind laws in most states prohibiting or limiting companies' ability to charge bad credit risks more; i.e., that credit based insurance scores are just a subterfuge (proxy) for discriminating on the basis of race and/or poverty.
Powell provides a review of the predictive accuracy of insurance scores since first appearing in the academic literature in 1949, including an examination of the methods and results of several major investigations since (e.g., by the Texas Department of Insurance, EPIC Actuaries, and the Federal Trade Commission), and also presents abbreviated results from his own empirical investigation.
Insurance scores have been utilized to help differentiate between lower and higher insurance risks.
Individuals with higher insurance scores also seem to shop earlier, while those with lower scores tended to shop later.
Often the team narrowly in front entering the final two or three minutes, latch on a few insurance scores and so the 13-2 available about Clare winning by four, five or six points also appeals.
Suppose further that 30 percent of Mary's group received low insurance scores while only 20 percent of Alice's
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