Fiber

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Fiber

A slang term for the euro-U.S. dollar exchange rate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
* Food sources of insoluble fiber include wheat bran, whole grains, cereals, brown rice, seeds, and the skins of many fruits and vegetables.
The results showed in Table 1 agree with those results founds by Liese (1998), who argued that the most compound into the Guadua angustifolia culm is insoluble fiber. He showed that parenchymal cells represent nearly 60% of a bamboo volume, and other 20% are constituted by Bamboo fibers, and both, parenchyma and bamboo fiber are components of insoluble fiber.
A pureed food with added finely processed insoluble fiber would have to contain at least 2 grams of added fiber per serving to be labeled as "added fiber." Servings of commercially produced pureed food vary, but many are 60 grams to 120 grams, depending on whether they are grain-based, veggies, meats and the like.
Founded in 1917, and headquartered in North Tonawanda, NY, IFC is the industry leader in insoluble fiber products.
Arsenal Capital Partners, a New York-based private equity firm that invests in middle-market specialty industrial and healthcare companies, has acquired International Fiber Corporation (IFC), a supplier of cellulose-based insoluble fiber products for food and industrial applications globally.
Dietary fiber comes from plants and consists of both soluble and insoluble fiber. While fiber is not digestible, soluble fiber (dissolves in water) absorbs water as it goes through the digestive tract; insoluble fiber is digested unchanged.
For the body to regulate properly it needs a balanced blend of both soluble and insoluble fiber. As in whole food sources, soluble and insoluble fibers team up to create the most benefits for your body without the negative side effects.
No such effect was observed for insoluble fiber. Good sources of soluble fiber include oatmeal, oat cereal, lentils, apples, oranges, pears, nuts, flaxseeds, beans, dried peas, blueberries, psyllium, cucumbers, celery, and carrots.
Insoluble fiber (roughage), such as cellulose, speeds intestinal transit time (laxative effect) and reduces mineral absorption.
Insoluble fiber is composed of cellulose and its less crystalline counterpart hemicellulose.
It is composed of a complex matrix of insoluble fiber, soluble fiber and protein.