Insiders


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Insiders

Traditionally referring to the directors, senior officers and holders of more than 10% of the voting shares of the company, insiders now include anyone who possesses or has access to material, non-public information (inside information), including tippees. This could include, for example, even a junior employee who makes photocopies for a board meeting, or someone who is ‘tipped’ by an insider..

Insider

A person who has knowledge of or access to restricted or otherwise nonpublic information about a publicly-traded company. Examples include senior management and shareholders with more than a 10% stake in the company. Under most circumstances, it is a crime for an insider to make trades on the special information he/she possesses. See also: Inside information, Insider trading.
References in periodicals archive ?
The strict trade-disclosure rules for insiders reflect a strong, longstanding consensus in the United States that a corporation's insiders--its officers, directors, and controlling shareholder (if any)--should not be permitted to profit freely from their access to inside information about the firm.
Our database of insider trading filings shows that three other insiders bought shares in May of this year (http://www.
The law is clear that if corporate insiders trade on material, nonpublic information while silently failing to disclose the basis of their trade, their silence may ground a conviction.
The second argument relies on the entrepreneurial role played by corporate managers and how insider trading could be used to compensate those insiders for their entrepreneurial activities.
Corporate insiders who receive stock options may be restricted as to when they can sell the underlying stock.
I found that an outside investor could have simply bought a diversified portfolio of small-cap stocks with high yields and low price-to-earnings ratios, and would have received almost the same return (with lower risk) as the group of insiders in my study.
Insider trading is the epitome of an undefined, unconstitutionally vague offense.
So the Insiders, who conspire for a world without freedom, must obscure their global ambitions.
Partners and staff face tough decisions when managing the insider trading risk inherent in the freedom to buy and sell securities.
Insiders should count on nothing unless the company has a tradition of weighting the scales for current employees.
It's only fitting that the City Council, a country club for insiders, would once again be headed up by one of its own.
Although the Waste Management example is an extreme case, insiders such as directors, officers and key executives may be sending valuable signals when they sell their company's shares.