inner city

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inner city

Technically refers to the densely populated area just outside the central business district,but usually connotes a blighted area near the city center.

References in periodicals archive ?
There will be extra help for job-seekers in inner cities, where 60,000 vacancies remain.
On several measures, the inner cities actually outpaced U.S.
But the use of drug-free zone laws as case-management tools by prosecutors and police has at least one systematic and very troubling side effect: It creates a stark bias against inner cities and their largely poor, largely minority, residents.
Vandalism and violence, apathy and neglect become major problems for Black schools in the inner cities. Many inner city schools., have become open battle grounds with teachers entering their respective classrooms in fear of their charges (20)."
But what happens when we look at changes over the decade in the earnings of professionals in this "motor" sector of the advanced tertiary sphere, comparing the two CMAs and also their inner cities? Is the entrenchment of Toronto's position in the urban hierarchy and the "regionalisation" of Montreal's position reflected in a divergence of FIRE/BS professionals' incomes?
The new service economy, Porter says, has created the preconditions for inner cities' economic rebirth based on their strategic competitive advantages.
Second, the combination of post-industrial economics and hyper-acquisitive cultural forces have so undermined the lives of poor and working-class black communities that the public high schools in inner cities rarely produce students able to engage the works being offered by Black Studies departments.
A recent article in the National Catholic Reporter charged that the bishops, despite their professed commitment to social justice, have been completely absent from the drive to win fairer financial support for public schools in the inner cities and other impoverished neighborhoods.
In inner cities, "the rudiments of civilization have vanished like cellophane on fire."
Even in the North, inner cities can be an unhealthy place to live.
Despite decades of failed investment in America's inner cities, businesses are still faced with the great urban challenge: how to participate in urban renewal - and make it work.
In a concluding essay, instead of highlighting his colleagues' major findings about the underclass, Katz pleads for a "renewed public sphere" that begins rather than ends with the notion that the crisis within the country's inner cities can only be solved when the nation is ready to grapple with the legacy of racism and institutional failures.