ISS

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Related to Injury Severity Score: abbreviated injury scale

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A company that institutional investors use as their proxy in the annual meetings of publicly-traded companies in which institutional investors have shares. It advises institutional investors how to vote in these meetings and casts votes on their behalf. It provides these services in exchange for a fee. See also: Proxy firm.
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ISS

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References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of the relationship of "Revised Trauma Score" and "Trauma Injury Severity Score" with prognosis in trauma patients monitored in intensive care.
Abbreviations: ANCOVA = analysis of covariance, GWOT = Global War on Terror, ISS = Injury Severity Score, LOC = loss of consciousness, NSI = Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, PTA = posttraumatic amnesia, SVT = symptom validity test, TBI = traumatic brain injury.
Campbell and Kay developed Hand Injury Severity Score (HISS) to classify the severity of hand injury distal to the carpus [28].
allergy, hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking, and drug abuse), need for renal replacement therapy(RRT), important ICU outcomes (mortality, ICU and hospital length of stay, days under mechanical ventilation), the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV score, injury severity score (ISS) and acute physiology score (APS).
Demographics such as age, gender, mechanism of injury, complications, Injury Severity score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ICU--length of stay (LOS), and mortality were analyzed among trauma patients who need re-intubation within 48 hrs after extubation (group 1) compared to successfully extubated (group 2).
The classification of injuries by type and severity according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) forms the basis of several commonly used measures of overall injury severity such as the Injury Severity Score (ISS) (Baker et al.
Trauma patients were also divided into new injury severity score (NISS) less than 20, and NISS > 20 to stratify the severity of injury as mild or severe.
Demographics (age, gender, and nationality), passenger location in vehicle, use of protective devices, mode of transportation to the trauma center, injury severity score (ISS), type of injuries, anatomical body parts injured, ethanol intake, hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) LOS, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed.
The injury severity score (ISS), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and the presence of multiple trauma (polytrauma) were noted.
Variables such as gender, age, penetrating mechanism (gunshot wound (GSW) or stab wound (SW)), systolic blood pressure (SBP), American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Scaling (AAST-OIS) [3], other associated injuries (i.e., ileum/jejunum, iliac vessels), injury severity score (ISS), urinary and nonurinary complications, and length of stay (LOS) were also analyzed.
Usefulness of the abbreviated injury score and the injury severity score in comparison to the Glasgow coma scale in predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury.
35 patients died (overall mortality 5.9%); patients who died had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (p<0.0001), lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p<0.0001), and higher Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (p<0.0001),” says Dr Hefny.