IMF

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IMF

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

International Monetary Fund

An international organization that seeks to maintain stability in the global economy. It does this primarily by monitoring the balance of payments for different countries and implementing restructuring agreements with countries in need of help. It was established by Bretton Woods in 1944. See also: Special Drawing Rights, World Bank System.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

IMF

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

International Monetary Fund (IMF).

The IMF was set up as a result of the United Nations Bretton Woods Agreement of 1944 to help stabilize world currencies, lower trade barriers, and help developing nations pay off debt.

The IMF's activities are funded by developed nations and are sometimes the subject of intense criticism, either by the nations the IMF is designed to help, the nations footing the bill, or both.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

IMF

see INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

IMF

see INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Nordstrom, "Development of the inframammary fold and ptosis in breast reconstruction with textured tissue expanders," Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, vol.
The mammographer then ensures that the patient's inframammary fold is elevated, and adjusts the height of the C-arm.
(12) A large musculocutaneous perforator (through the pectoralis major muscle) from either the fifth or sixth branch sustains the inferior or central based pedicle and is found just medial to the breast meridian about 2 to 4 cm above the inframammary fold. The medially or superomedially based pedicle is the basis for the Hall-Findlay developed vertical reduction mammaplasty technique (see Figure 7).
Thus, the reconstructed breast may be left with a natural pseudo-ptosis, a well-defined inframammary fold, and enhanced inferior pole projection, which better match the contralateral native breast [58].
However, when the intermammary tissue consists of fibrous septa and glandular tissue rather than fat, excision of the tissue and subdermal suturing through small inframammary incision should be performed to avoid unsightly scars.[sup][2],[3] Midline vertical skin incisions over the sternum with lateral extension into the inframammary folds and various local flaps for repair should be avoided.
Volume, contour, placement of breast mound, and inframammary fold were evaluated with zero to 2 points for each parameter.
Ideal mediolateral oblique positioning should permit the breast to be imaged from high in the axilla down to and including the inframammary fold. The term oblique applies to the plane of breast compression.
One of these, the skin-sparing mastectomy, means that all the breast skin (but not the nipple or areola) and usually the inframammary fold are retained.