Inductive reasoning

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Inductive reasoning

The attempt to use information about a specific situation to draw a conclusion.

Inductive Reasoning

A way of forming reasonable conclusions by gathering evidence and then forming principles based upon them. For example, if one wishes to find out how a stock will perform, one gathers as much evidence on that stock as possible and makes a conclusion based on that, regardless of one's feelings or suppositions beforehand. The advantage of inductive reasoning is that its evidence offers applicability to "real world" scenarios; however, a disadvantage is that one's evidence may be inaccurate or anecdotal. It is sometimes difficult to know how much evidence is needed to justify coming to a general conclusion. See also: Deductive reasoning, Analogy.
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(3) A tentative definition for a quantitative concept of degree of confirmation with respect to a simple language system and a few theorems of inductive logic based on the definition have been given in 'On Inductive Logic,' Philosophy of Science, Vol.
A neat trick when 'powers of 2' appear is to convert any numerical analysis from base 10 to base 2: with the Tower of Hanoi problem, it is fun to show the above inductive logic using binary notation ("There are 10 types of people: one who knows the meaning of the binary system, and one who does not"--source unknown).
Zeroski, Inductive Logic Programming: Techniques and Applications, Ellis Horwood, New York, NY, USA, 1994.
In Muggleton, S., ed.: Inductive Logic Programming.
Rather to regain this systematicity--indeed, to determine how, in a deductive architecture, properly to qualify argumentative claims that are less than true or certain--we need independent theories of plausibility and probability, whether an inductive logic, a theory of statistics, or something else.
These grand theories are predicated on inductive logic and develop explanations for the rise of the welfare state by applying theoretical constructs to the experiences of a few nation states.
Strawson compares this project to Hume's project of identifying "rules for judging causes and effects." Strawson says he has some sympathy for such a project, but balks at calling the results an inductive logic.
Logical correctness in deductive/non-ampliative logic is a property of the form and not context dependent whereas logical correctness in inductive logic is a property of a particular occasion of use of the form.
Deductive logic (theory-driven research) as well as inductive logic (research-driven theory) are discussed.
Robert's legalistic subjectivity is an epistemological space in which he must learn the appropriate combination of deductive and inductive logic in the construction and interpretation of evidence.
It involves inductive logic and the use of the scientific method.
SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY TASKS CAN BE carried out using inductive logic programming (ILP).