Inductive reasoning

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Inductive reasoning

The attempt to use information about a specific situation to draw a conclusion.

Inductive Reasoning

A way of forming reasonable conclusions by gathering evidence and then forming principles based upon them. For example, if one wishes to find out how a stock will perform, one gathers as much evidence on that stock as possible and makes a conclusion based on that, regardless of one's feelings or suppositions beforehand. The advantage of inductive reasoning is that its evidence offers applicability to "real world" scenarios; however, a disadvantage is that one's evidence may be inaccurate or anecdotal. It is sometimes difficult to know how much evidence is needed to justify coming to a general conclusion. See also: Deductive reasoning, Analogy.
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So if you want to argue persuasively using this type of inductive argument, you must provide a great deal of evidence to make it a strong argument.
If the size of the set of examples is small, for the inductive argument to be properly formed one must consider all, or the majority of, the examples.
So if the size of the set of examples is too large to list, for the inductive argument to be properly formed one must consider a representative sample.
Accordingly, we can reformulate in statistical terms a strong inductive argument form to help make a working inference about the aggregate of swans from a large sample of such large flying birds.
The basic form of this type of inductive argument may be symbolized as follows (let [E.
For example, if we let X be the Surgeon General, Y be smoking causes cancer, and Z be health and medicine, the inductive argument produced is as follows.
This is an inductive argument because one may observe people who smoke and get lung cancer, but still find people who have smoked all their lives and won't get the disease (no matter what the authority says).
The general form of this type of inductive argument may be symbolized as follows.
So, consider again the basic form of this type of inductive argument
This is a WEAK inductive argument because it has the following form.
Stove mounts his attack on Hume's argument by discussing an inductive argument from
Now our reason for this judgement is clearly that before we declare an inductive argument rational, the degree of confirmation given the conclusion by the premises must be sufficiently high to justify believing the conclusion.