Impression

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Impression

A user's view of an online advertisement. Each time a website viewer sees an online ad, this is one impression. The more impressions an ad receives, the more likely it is that a user will click on it. Most online ads are sold by cost per thousand of impressions. See also: CPC.
References in classic literature ?
He goes on to enunciate the general principle "that all our simple ideas in their first appearance are derived from simple impressions, which are correspondent to them, and which they exactly represent"
I tell you my impression, in all its horror and in all its folly
For the moment I could say nothing to her; the dreadful impression that I have tried to describe to you came back to me with the coming back of my life.
Far and near the view suggested the same dreary impressions of solitude and decay, and the glorious brightness of the summer sky overhead seemed only to deepen and harden the gloom and barrenness of the wilderness on which it shone.
I fear they made more impression on me than I made on them.
One thing only is certain, and that is that Big-Tooth did stamp into the cerebral constitution of one of his progeny all the impressions of his life, and stamped them in so indelibly that the hosts of intervening generations have failed to obliterate them.
He had since called in person upon her, making an extremely favourable impression, for the princess had received him each day since, and had introduced him into several good houses.
There is no need to answer this letter immediately -- unless I have written it under a mistaken impression of what you have accomplished since leaving London.
Now that my mother's idea had found its way from her mind to mine, the impression produced on me was painful in the last degree.
One evening--with nothing to lead up or to prepare it-- I felt the cold touch of the impression that had breathed on me the night of my arrival and which, much lighter then, as I have mentioned, I should probably have made little of in memory had my subsequent sojourn been less agitated.
It was true that her profile was beautiful; it was extraordinary how English girls of that class had so often a perfection of outline which took your breath away, but it was as cold as marble; and the faint green of her delicate skin gave an impression of unhealthiness.
The Lord Advocate--evidently perceiving that any attempt to weaken that impression would not be likely to succeed--confined himself, in cross-examination, to two significant questions.