Impeachment

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Impeachment

The act of attempting to remove a public official from office. An impeachment does not necessarily result in removal, since another step is required before the official is forced to leave office. For example, in the United States, the House of Representatives may impeach the president by a majority vote. The case is then passed on for trial to the Senate, which may remove the president with a two-thirds vote.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trump as the 45th president of the United States, the calls for his impeachment have been nearly constant.
Bowman III --High Crimes and Misdemeanors: A History of Impeachment for the Age of Trump --makes a timely appearance on the "Current Events" shelves of local bookstores.
But Justice Ja'neh's contention is that Chief Justice Korkpor and three other justices signed a ruling which gives a green light for his (Ja'neh's) impeachment.
The Senate opened the impeachment trial Thursday after majority justices of the Supreme Court inclusive of Chief Justice Korkpor denied two separate petitions filed by Justice Ja'neh and four senators to prohibit his impeachment trial due to alleged violation of the Constitution.
After all, impeachments are largely immune from judicial review, (98) and there always remains the somewhat cynical view that a Senator, believing his or her decision to be essentially unreviewable, will simply do as she pleases based on her personal political calculations.
The disconnect among Senators as to what it means to "convict" an impeached party is apparent in the history of impeachments. The Clinton impeachment provides the most obvious, and compelling, examples.
During plenary session, the lower House referred the two impeachment complaints against Duterte filed by Magdalo Rep.
The justice committee will determine whether there is form and substance on the impeachment complaints.
PINCKNEY did not see the necessity of impeachments. He was sure they ought not to issue from the legislature, who would in that case hold them as a rod over the executive, and by that means effectually destroy his independence.
287-288: "Again, there are many offences, purely political, which have been held to be within the reach ofparliamentary impeachments, not one of which is in the slightest manner alluded to in our statute book.
The constitution approved by the people of the Oregon Territory in 1857 did not include an important check on the executive branch of government: the Legislature's power of impeachment. Oregon became a state two years later, and for most of two centuries the omission has gone unregretted.
To put recent impeachments in context, this report examines