Impaired credit

(redirected from Impaired Credits)

Impaired credit

Result of a borrower's reduced credit rating.

Impaired Credit

A credit rating or FICO score that has recently been reduced. A company or individual may have impaired credit if its financial situation changes in such a way that there is a greater likelihood of defaulting on a bond or business or personal loan. Impaired credit makes it more difficult for a company or person to borrow more funds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although impaired credits grew further in Q1-Q3 2017 following an increase in the previous year, the NPL to gross loans ratio remained at a satisfactory level - albeit higher than the peer group average - while LLRs continued to provide more than full cover.
The bank's diverse and strong loan book with no write-offs and impaired credits making 1.
This is in view of the challenges associated with restoring net profitability to a solid footing following sustained net losses and the increase in impaired credits last year.
Moody's understands that the impaired credits include some of the bank's largest customers and relate to both domestic and regional high-profile corporate defaults," he said, adding that a decline in asset quality would continue in 2010.
The provision for loan losses was $1,488,000 less than last year, primarily as a result of the decreases in impaired loans resulting from positive resolutions of certain significant impaired credits.
So far, the noted increase in NPLs seen in FY17 mainly related to the translation of foreign currency (mostly $) denominated impaired credits, and to a lesser extent newly classified accounts.
The agency also cut to BBB+ the lender's financial strength rating (FSR), in view of the challenges associated with restoring net profitability to a solid footing following sustained net losses and the increase in impaired credits in 2009.
Although the vast majority of the insured portfolio is sound, like their competitors, XLCA and XLFA have exposure to some impaired credits.
JAB had achieved relative success in resolving impaired credits in the past through effective remedial measures.
Like its competitors, XLCA and XLFA have exposure to some impaired credits but Fitch believes these are manageable at the present time.
Although asset quality remains weak as evidenced by a higher than sector average NPL ratio, impaired credits started to decline in the final quarter of FY 2012, due to write-offs.
The private sector banks, which have generally been aggressive in maintaining or increasing reserve levels and in attacking their stock of impaired loans with heavy chargeoffs, appear to be much better positioned to absorb substantial increases in impaired credits in the private sector, although a haircut to government exposure combined with a substantial increase in impaired loans could also lead to significant hits to equity