Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998


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Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998

Commonly abbreviated ITADA. Legislation in the United States that made it a federal offense to use another person's identifying information to commit a federal, state or local crime. It also authorized the Federal Trade Commission to register complaints of identity theft and all federal law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute them. The passage of ITADA marked the first time that identity theft became a crime in itself in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Federal Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998, most do not require that the thief have possession of an actual document in order to be found guilty.
"Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998." Available at www.identitytheft.org/title18.htm (accessed 11 March 2002).
Shaw also delves into the Driver's Privacy Protection Act of 1994 and the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998. The former was passed, in part, to protect women from stalkers, while the latter protects consumers from a major threat to privacy and financial peace of mind.
The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998 made identity theft a federal crime and recognized the true victim--the person who had their identity stolen.