Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998

(redirected from Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act)

Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998

Commonly abbreviated ITADA. Legislation in the United States that made it a federal offense to use another person's identifying information to commit a federal, state or local crime. It also authorized the Federal Trade Commission to register complaints of identity theft and all federal law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute them. The passage of ITADA marked the first time that identity theft became a crime in itself in the United States.
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In 1998, the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act (65) made it "a felony to possess, transfer or produce personal identification information with unlawful intent." (66) This altered the crime from one against a financial institution whose establishment was compromised by the theft to one against the consumer victim whose identity was stolen.
Per the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act, the FTC is responsible for receiving and processing identity theft complaints, providing informational materials, and referring complaints to the appropriate entities, including the major credit reporting agencies and law enforcement agencies.
As defined by the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998, identity theft occurs when a person knowingly transfers, or uses without lawful authority, a means of identification of another person with the intent to commit, or to aid or abet, any unlawful activity that constitutes a violation of federal law, or that constitutes a felony under any applicable state or local law.
(2) The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act defined "identity theft" as occurring when someone "knowingly transfers, possesses, or uses, without lawful authority, a means of identification of another person with the intent to commit, or to aid or abet, or in connection with any unlawful activity that constitutes a violation of Federal law, or that constitutes a felony under any applicable state or local law." 18 U.S.C.
The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1988 set up this centralized complaint forum.
Congress also has passed laws specifically regarding identity theft: the 1998 Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act; the 2003 Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions (FACT) Act; and the 2004 Identity Theft Penalty Enhancement Act.
The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act, enacted in October 1998, makes identity theft a crime punishable by fines and between 15 and 30 years in prison.
30, 1998, following considerable debate about the deleterious effects of identity theft, the Federal government passed the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act of 1998 (ITADA).
Another statutory outlet for victims of identity theft, the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act, (103) also fails to help victims of negligently enabled imposter fraud.
The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act. Enacted October 30, 1998, this legislation makes identity theft a Federal crime with penalties of up to 15 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $250,000.
(41) In 1998, Congress passed the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act and officially classified private citizens as "victims" of identity theft.