exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the sensation of the portrait photography, a photographer can choose double greater ISO speed than those that would be elected to work with film, and not to expect the perception of increasing the structure of the image which expands the selection of optimal combination of lens aperture and exposure time.
Samples (colour chart and portrait photographs) were shot with the ISO speeds 100/21 ISO, 400/27 ISO and 3200/36 ISO.
As an example, the Hormann Iso Speed Cold door panels have a thermal U-value of only 0.3 W/m2K.
The camera offers ISO speeds ranging from 100 to 32000, and can be expanded to 102400.
Key tips are to stay downwind of your subject, don't make sudden movements with camera and lens, and maintain a fast shutter speed by choosing wider apertures and faster ISO speeds. Longer lenses are essential to make frame-filling portraits from a distance, and also for depicting mammals in the context of the woodland setting.
For one, they're often more sensitive to low light than pocket cameras, particularly at high ISO speeds. While any current model will produce good results, popular brands such as Canon, Nikon, Sony, or Pentax offer a wide array of bodies and high-quality lenses to fit almost any budget.
For example, Part IV covers camera settings and the chapters include, Setting Up, Aperture and Shutter Priority Mode, Manual Mode, ISO Speeds, and Auto Exposure Bracketing.
Faster "film'' ISO speeds, a zillion more images fit on a card vs.
Shoot with great definition at ISO speeds from 80 to 12800, and capture brilliantly realistic 1080p/60p Full HD video.
Image quality is nothing short of superb, with low noise at fast ISO speeds, while skin tones and textures are delivered exceptionally well in low light conditions.
Lenses in the order of 20 - 135mm should be ideal to capture the comet if it achieves naked eye visibility ISO speeds of 400 upwards and exposures of between 1 to 10 seconds or so should produce results.