Special Drawing Rights

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Special Drawing Rights (SDR)

A form of international reserve assets, created by the IMF in 1967, whose value is based on a portfolio of widely used currencies.

Special Drawing Rights

A reserve currency created by the International Monetary Fund to reduce the pressure on gold and the U.S. dollar in international transactions. It was established in the late 1960s and is mainly used in the IMF's internal accounting. A few currencies are pegged to the SDR; they derive their value from a currency basket consisting of the U.S. dollar, the Japanese yen, the British pound, and the euro.
References in periodicals archive ?
The country had $1.40 billion in International Monetary Fund reserve positions, little changed from November, and $3.03 billion in IMF special drawing rights, down from $3.05 billion.
As of February 28, foreign currency reserves stood at USD 1.19 trillion, gold at USD 39.08 billion, IMF reserves at USD 13.02 billion, and IMF special drawing rights at USD 19.63 billion.
As of October 31, foreign currency reserves stood at USD 1.196 trillion, IMF reserves at USD 14.57 billion, IMF special drawing rights at USD 19.95 billion and gold at USD 42.29 billion.
It had $1.49 billion in International Monetary Fund reserve positions, down from $1.57 billion the previous month, and $2.92 billion in IMF special drawing rights, up from $2.89 billion.
It had $1.59 billion in International Monetary Fund reserve positions, up from $1.58 billion in May, and $2.88 billion in IMF special drawing rights, up from $2.87 billion.
As of July 31, foreign currency reserves stood at USD 1.197 trillion, gold at USD 39.91 billion, IMF reserves at USD 15.55 billion and IMF special drawing rights at USD 19.46 billion.
It had $1.58 billion in International Monetary Fund reserve positions, up from $1.49 billion in April, and $2.87 billion in IMF special drawing rights, up from $2.85 billion.
The drop in foreign exchange reserves, which includes convertible foreign currencies, gold, International Monetary Fund (IMF) reserves and IMF special drawing rights, was mainly due to the declining market value of its US and European governments' bond holdings, the ministry said.
It had $1.49 billion in International Monetary Fund reserve positions, compared with $1.51 billion in March, and $2.85 billion in IMF special drawing rights, up from $2.84 billion.