Hysteresis

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Hysteresis

Used to characterize a lagging effect. Firms may fail to enter markets that appear attractive, or firms that are once invested in a market may persist in operating at a loss. The effect is characteristic of investments with high entry and exit costs along with high uncertainty.

Hysteresis

In economics, a situation or indicator that persists despite evidence that it should not. For example, the unemployment rate tends to remain high even after GDP growth has resumed, in part because business owners are afraid that growth will turn negative again even if they have no rational reason for believing so. One may think of hysteresis as an economy's collective memory. See also: Lagging indicator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The large diameter of the control wheel also reduces the amount of friction or hysterisis. Tuning marks are inscribed on the control wheel making the sometimes-difficult task of tuning rather easy.
Other competencies highlighted by the tests included repeatability, linearity and hysterisis. Levelflex M also offers quick and easy installation, a menu guided display and reliable measurement of materials and liquids.
Following the signal detection, an adjustable hysterisis window is provided for high system sensitivity or squelch protection against in-hand interference.
Besides, the extent of localized attack depends solely on the nature of the hysterisis loop, it seems reasonable to predict the nature of attack caused due to various treatment effects.
The ThinGap[TM] TG3600 Series slotless brushless PM motor from G&G Technology incorporates new winding technology that eliminates eddy current and hysterisis losses and achieves very high power efficiency over a wide speed range.
The standard features include simple ranging capabilities, single setpoint/alarm with a 10-amp relay, a solid state output, adjustable hysterisis, and 115/230 VAC selectable input voltage.
Bentley MacLeod, Supply Side Hysterisis: The Case of the Canadian Unemployment Insurance System.
Changing demographics, declining unionisation, possible perception of increased job insecurity associated with corporate downsizing, and the impact of the low level of unemployment in the past few years which may be helping previously unemployed workers to gain entry into jobs and acquire new skills ("reverse hysterisis") are all factors that may have contributed to declining structural unemployment.