test

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Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrogen breath test. This test is noninvasive, easily administered, and relatively cost effective for diagnosing impaired lactose digestion.
A response to antibiotics in patients with IBS has been shown to correlate with normalization of the results of lactulose hydrogen breath tests in previous studies.
In addition, more than half of these self-identified lactose intolerant individuals were not, in fact, lactase deficient, based on a hydrogen breath test conducted after the lactose challenge.
Genotype LP-Alleles LNP LHBT (C[T.bar]-13910/ (CC-13910 Total Phenotype T[G.bar]-13915) & TT-13915) 1 (TG) 31 32 Symptomatic Positive (LI) (42) 0 10 10 Asymptomatic (LT) 1 (CT) 0 1 Symptomatic Negative (LI) (8) 7 (2CT&5TG) 0 7 Asymptomatic (LT) NHP 2 (TG) 0 2 Symptomatic (LI) TOTAL 11 41 52 LP: Lactase Persistence, LNP: Lactase Non-Persistence, LHBT: Lactose Hydrogen Breath Test, NHP: Non Hydrogen Producers.
This could include a hydrogen breath test which involves fasting overnight and then consuming some lactose - if a large amount of hydrogen is present then lactose intolerance is diagnosed.
CBC, chemistry, thyroid function test, stool exam, ultrasonography, hydrogen breath test, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein have all very limited accuracy in discriminating IBS from organic diseases.
Entenmann et al., "Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results," Journal of Breath Research, vol.