Society

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Society

A group of persons who, by accident or design, are related to each other in some way and therefore have to deal with each other. Examples of societies include everyone who attends the same church, lives in the same country, or belongs to the same club. According to most political and economic theories, persons in a society have the responsibility to care for other members of that society, though exactly how to do so remains a matter of contention. While some theories emphasize the role of society, more individualistic theories tend to minimize its role.
References in periodicals archive ?
Khamenehi added: "Today the enemies of human societies confront Islam.
It might appear that human societies are naturally hierarchical because most of history records monarchies or other forms of dictatorial governments.
The contributors explore how patriarchy came to be the dominant social system in human societies, how patriarchy has been maintained and reinforced, and the impact of patriarchy on contemporary life.
Complete and unabridged on thirteen cassette tapes for a total of twenty hours and twenty minutes, Don't Know Much About Mythology presents for listeners a significant overview of the gods, goddesses, and creation stories which shaped human societies and cultures down through recorded millennia.
But history shows that religious individuals and their institutions have no immunity against that which plagues all actual human societies, namely, the willingness to do terrible things on behalf of what seems important or self-securing.
In this case, Diamond, a biologist, is trying to apply biology's master narrative to human societies.
The answers became the basis of his provocative 1999 best seller, ``Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies,'' now transformed by producer-director Tim Lambert into a user-friendly three-part series on PBS.
Cicero, in The Laws (122), spoke of natural law as the innate laws of nature to which it is just for all human societies to conform, and which can be discerned by reason.
Recommends: Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fates of Human Societies
The term "myth" is one calculated to cause discomfiture among historians, rightly alert to the discrepancies between the lofty ideals celebrated in political panegyric and the baser realities of human societies in action.
Renfrew explains that the interaction that artists have with the material world mimics the development of human societies.
War begets war and shapes human societies as it does so.