Society

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Society

A group of persons who, by accident or design, are related to each other in some way and therefore have to deal with each other. Examples of societies include everyone who attends the same church, lives in the same country, or belongs to the same club. According to most political and economic theories, persons in a society have the responsibility to care for other members of that society, though exactly how to do so remains a matter of contention. While some theories emphasize the role of society, more individualistic theories tend to minimize its role.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many human beings, the problem is Europe's packaging of an example of that story merely in order to favour a class of Europeans economically.The finger of that European class is thus perpetually raised in accusation of all other human societies, especially African, Asian and native American.
Khamenehi added: "Today the enemies of human societies confront Islam.
of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) introduce students to human societies and the forces responsible for social change using a comparative and historical approach that looks at the emergence, development, and extinction of societies over the centuries and encourages students to use evidence to evaluate ideas.
"The circumpolar north is widely seen as an observatory for changing relations between human societies and their environment, and analysis of the data gathered from all phases of our study eventually will enable more effective collaboration among social, natural, and medical sciences as they begin to devise adequate responses to the global warming the world faces today."
AaAa It also reviewed activities of the Tanenbaum Centre for Interreligious Understanding and means of strengthening ties of the peaceful coexistence and understanding among all human societies.
Some human societies are democratic; some are dictatorial.
Sub-Saharan Africa: An Environmental History joins others in the 'Nature and Human Societies' series to survey both positive and negative environmental effects of human activities from colonialism to modern urban pressures.
The contributors explore how patriarchy came to be the dominant social system in human societies, how patriarchy has been maintained and reinforced, and the impact of patriarchy on contemporary life.
Complete and unabridged on thirteen cassette tapes for a total of twenty hours and twenty minutes, Don't Know Much About Mythology presents for listeners a significant overview of the gods, goddesses, and creation stories which shaped human societies and cultures down through recorded millennia.
But history shows that religious individuals and their institutions have no immunity against that which plagues all actual human societies, namely, the willingness to do terrible things on behalf of what seems important or self-securing.
In this case, Diamond, a biologist, is trying to apply biology's master narrative to human societies.
Cicero, in The Laws (122), spoke of natural law as the innate laws of nature to which it is just for all human societies to conform, and which can be discerned by reason.