Human Resources

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Human Resources

1. The department of a company that deals with hiring and retaining employees, firing those who do not perform, and managing disputes between employees or between an employee and a manager. Human resources departments often manage pensions, insurance, and other benefits as well. They are most common in medium- and large-sized companies.

2. See: Human Capital.
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering the factors receiving lower evaluations by the human resource managers it must be realized that, none of the scores on a four point scale indicated on Table 1, page 11 are considered to be low.
The human resource managers scored "using and interpreting tables and graphs" low on the scale and also knowledge of "distance communications technologies" received a relatively low score.
The human resource managers indicated that integrity and recognition of appropriate confidentiality in communication were the highest traits needed for recent business college graduates to possess.
In view of the recent corporate scandals it is not surprising that the human resource managers would place a heavy emphasis on competencies related to communication integrity and appropriate confidentiality.
When considering curriculum revisions and changes, the views of the corporation human resource managers is an essential input.
Table 1 Human Resource Managers Evaluation of Communication Competencies Rank Weighted Average 1.
This paper describes some of the ways in which the interactive practices of human resource managers avoid trouble by creating and sustaining fair organization for themselves and others.
Thus, the taken-for-granted speaking practices that constitute attributes of consistency or fairness are of theoretical interest, and, as human resource managers themselves state, human resources work is relational (Forray 1998).
We present examples of verbal interactions between human resource managers and other employees in a number of different organizational settings.
This approach focuses on the way in which human resource managers themselves are creating what they consider to be 'fair organization'.
In other words, it is on these occasions that human resource managers must work to sustain the sense that 'nothing unusual is happening here' (Emerson 1970).
In avoiding inconsistency, human resource managers must dissuade others from a proposed course of action if that proposed action can be viewed as being inconsistent with past actions.

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