Horizontal Specialization

Horizontal Specialization

A management style in which several persons with equal authority are given oversight over specific departments or tasks. For example, one manager may be assigned to human relations, a second to operations and a third to accounting. However, no manager has authority over another. See also: Vertical Specialization.
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Horizontal specialization and more focused business models are also contributing to the breakup of centralized R&D.
Horizontal specialization in the metro transport space enables Telseon to maintain a highly optimized network and continuously drive down its partners' network management costs.
These events seem like a textbook example of traditional horizontal specialization, in which there is just more trade in motor vehicles.(11) Nevertheless, the basic data provide a hint that vertical specialization also occurred.
This phenomenon leaves open the question, Why has vertical specialization grown more rapidly than horizontal specialization? One answer is that improvements in communications technologies may favor vertical trade.
Therefore, reductions in these tariff rates will spur vertical specialization more than they will horizontal specialization. For example, the tariff rates on automotive trade between the United States and Canada before the 1965 Auto Agreement were roughly 10 to 15 percent, which was not high by historical standards.
Horizontal specialization entails offering a specific target group a (relatively) complete solution to their problem(s).