Hong


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Hong

One of several major companies in Hong Kong or another special administrative region of China. The term began in the early 19th century and referred to companies that provided financing for Hong Kong business; it has since expanded to include large conglomerates based in Hong Kong. Prior to the 1997 handover to the Chinese, hongs were owned by British companies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hong Kingston: From my first star that appeared in the sky, I remember looking up and using my wishes to wish against war.
We examined the dynamics of reported SARS clinical cases in three cities in Asia (Beijing, Hong Kong, and Singapore) and used the Richards model (4) to predict SARS infection over several months.
Hong Kong residents are justifiably alarmed that the legislation will be interpreted to make it illegal for them to criticize government policies or to have any contact with religious and political groups outlawed on the mainland.
In addition, Asia is the home of a number of significant financial and banking centers, including Hong Kong.
Hong cemented his reputation during the 2002 World Cup in Korea and Japan this summer, when he was awarded the Bronze Ball for his outstanding performance in helping the South Koreans advance to the semifinals, where it lost to Germany.
Recently, Hong and Milgram (2000) developed a theoretical model on homework motivation and preference based on numerous empirical studies (Hong, in press; Hong & Lee, 2000; Hong & Milgram, 1999; Hong, Milgram, & Perkins, 1995; Hong, Tomoff, et al.
In this article, I describe and analyze the development of career counseling in Hong Kong in three settings: school, university, and community.
The note also sets out examples of how the Insurance Authority will determine whether an Internet insurance activity originating from outside Hong Kong is governed by the Insurance Companies Ordinance.
Hong Kong's decline has had little to do with the fact that Britain handed control over the city to communist China in 1997.
The collapse of overvalued stock and property markets was the first test of the government, specifically the Hong Kong Monetary Authority's (HKMA) attitude towards intervention in financial markets.
Until only a decade ago, Hong Kong had little cultural identity other than what was status quo in China.
Almost immediately after the Brittish seized Hong Kong Island in 1842 as a response to China's refusal to allow the Brittish to import opium into its country, Britain passed laws in its newly acquired colony to restrict the freedoms of the Chinese living there.